Visions4DigitalHealth

Pharma and medical device companies invest heavily in ensuring that patients have timely access to their therapies. Significant effort and investment are required at a global, national and local level to ensure a successful product launch. On many occasions, such efforts can be hampered at a patient level, due to health system challenges such as accessing timely medical assessment, testing, diagnosis or treatment prescription. This is particularly the case when trying to access novel or rare treatments, where care pathways are underdeveloped.

Digital health solutions have the potential to enable patients to take control over their care, access appointments on demand, monitor their condition and communicate directly with their healthcare practitioner. This requires careful planning, observation and user-centric design to ensure widespread uptake and utilisation. But done well, digital solutions can lead to improved patient outcomes, productivity and efficiency gains for the health system.

Visions4DigitalHealth support pharmaceutical and medical device companies with the design and delivery of digital health solutions that contribute to meaningful improvements in patient care.

Visions4DigitalHealth guide clients throughout their digital journey, from understanding the environment through to strategy development, product design and evidence generation.

Visions4DigitalHealth are underpinned by robust customer insight gained from our extensive network of healthcare and technology experts.

All of our digital solutions conform to ISO 27001 for Information Security, ISO IEC 20000-1 for Security Service Management, GDPR/HIMMS compliance for privacy, and HL7/FIHR coding standards, to enable interoperability with other devices. Our annual Cyber Essentials certification ensures that we have stringent cyber security measures in place, guarding us against the most common cyber threats.

Get in touch now to find out how Visions4DigitalHealth can help you unleash your brand’s potential.

Visions4DigitalHealth Wheel of Support

Case Study 1:

Supporting patients to receive timely oncology interventions

We worked with a pharmaceutical company who provide treatments to patients undergoing chemotherapy in an oncology unit. It was clear that patients were not always able to undertake their treatment according to the prescribed 28-day treatment cycle. Treatments could not be scheduled unless a patient’s blood test results showed sufficient recovery following the previous treatment cycle. The blood tests were typically carried out in GP practices, but the nurses in the hospital-based oncology unit had no access to the results.

Typically, one or more nurses would spend the entire day calling practices to get test results. The GP receptionists often did not have access to the information required, so communication was delayed. This meant treatments had to be postponed. The long-term impact was reduced capacity of the treatment centre, leading many patients to suffer delays to their treatment or cancellations. We identified that many of the GP practices were using the same IT system to record blood test results.

We worked with the hospital and the GP federation to build a gateway between the blood test results reporting system, the hospital oncology patient record system and the patient’s mobile device via an app. Once a test had been reported, all stakeholders could access the results without the need for multiple phone conversations. This meant that patients were far more likely to receive their treatment over a 28-day cycle, ultimately improving outcomes and ensuring timely access for new patients to treatment.

Case Study 3:

Utilising digital technology to improve timely diagnosis and management of long-term conditions

We worked with a pharmaceutical company, an NHS organisation and a digital diagnostics company to implement a risk stratification tool that would highlight patients who were at risk from common long-term conditions, such as heart failure, COPD and diabetes. The NHS organisation provided GP and community health services for a population of approximately 250,000 people in a relatively deprived, rural part of the country. The long-term aim was to develop a model of care that led to proactive and effective management of long-term conditions in the community.

Patients identified through risk stratification were able to access a range of remote support services, including consultations and monitoring. GPs could utilise the risk stratification tool to ensure that care could be delivered in a timely fashion and according to clinical need. The service enabled highly vulnerable patients to feel better supported at home, and rapid access to local care providers reduced the likelihood that the person would need to contact emergency services if they were struggling to manage their condition. The project resulted in a saved eight emergency admissions per week, on average, saving around £151,000 per week.

Case Study 2:

Helping patients to self-care at home

We worked with a medical device manufacturer who provided dialysis machines for use by people receiving their treatment at home. A common complication of dialysis is infection at the site of blood exchange. Once a catheter site is infected, the patient will require an operation to develop a new fistula to support dialysis. This means the patient cannot receive their dialysis out of hospital for several weeks, and often, they will require a catheter to be inserted into their neck, which creates a further and significant risk of serious infection. We worked with the company to develop a digital diagnostic tool that could take a high-grade photo of the dialysis site.

The device also recorded temperature and heart rate as well as enabling nurses and patients to communicate via a secure weblink. The information collected was used remotely to assess the risk of infection. This ensured that antibiotics could be prescribed at the first sign of infection, reducing the likelihood that the catheter would need to be removed and enabling patients to continue with their treatment at home. Nurses could also use the camera to ensure the patients were using the correct hand washing technique and carrying out dialysis in a way that minimised the risk of future infections.

Case Study 4:

Device product development

A global medical device company were looking to differentiate their product, a diagnostics device used in diabetes management, that had no data sharing capabilities. They faced strong competition from providers of similar products. However, none of the major players had a comprehensive digital offering that enabled patients to access results or analyse long-term changes in their health.

We worked with the company to develop a data and digital services offering to complement the hardware capabilities of the product and support their differentiation strategy. This included the use of data from the device to provide an analytics platform that the patient could review and share with their healthcare practitioner to support their ongoing management. The company implemented the proposed changes and designed an analytics platform that enabled access to device data for all the key stakeholders. The adaptations were successful in securing further R&D investment and attracting major multinational customers.

Case Study 1:

We worked with a pharmaceutical company who provide treatments to patients undergoing chemotherapy in an oncology unit. It was clear that patients were not always able to undertake their treatment according to the prescribed 28-day treatment cycle. Treatments could not be scheduled unless a patient’s blood test results showed sufficient recovery following the previous treatment cycle. The blood tests were typically carried out in GP practices, but the nurses in the hospital-based oncology unit had no access to the results.

Typically, one or more nurses would spend the entire day calling practices to get test results. The GP receptionists often did not have access to the information required, so communication was delayed. This meant treatments had to be postponed. The long-term impact was reduced capacity of the treatment centre, leading many patients to suffer delays to their treatment or cancellations. We identified that many of the GP practices were using the same IT system to record blood test results.

We worked with the hospital and the GP federation to build a gateway between the blood test results reporting system, the hospital oncology patient record system and the patient’s mobile device via an app. Once a test had been reported, all stakeholders could access the results without the need for multiple phone conversations. This meant that patients were far more likely to receive their treatment over a 28-day cycle, ultimately improving outcomes and ensuring timely access for new patients to treatment.

Case Study 2:

We worked with a medical device manufacturer who provided dialysis machines for use by people receiving their treatment at home. A common complication of dialysis is infection at the site of blood exchange. Once a catheter site is infected, the patient will require an operation to develop a new fistula to support dialysis. This means the patient cannot receive their dialysis out of hospital for several weeks, and often, they will require a catheter to be inserted into their neck, which creates a further and significant risk of serious infection. We worked with the company to develop a digital diagnostic tool that could take a high-grade photo of the dialysis site.

The device also recorded temperature and heart rate as well as enabling nurses and patients to communicate via a secure weblink. The information collected was used remotely to assess the risk of infection. This ensured that antibiotics could be prescribed at the first sign of infection, reducing the likelihood that the catheter would need to be removed and enabling patients to continue with their treatment at home. Nurses could also use the camera to ensure the patients were using the correct hand washing technique and carrying out dialysis in a way that minimised the risk of future infections.

Case Study 3:

We worked with a pharmaceutical company, an NHS organisation and a digital diagnostics company to implement a risk stratification tool that would highlight patients who were at risk from common long-term conditions, such as heart failure, COPD and diabetes. The NHS organisation provided GP and community health services for a population of approximately 250,000 people in a relatively deprived, rural part of the country. The long-term aim was to develop a model of care that led to proactive and effective management of long-term conditions in the community.

Patients identified through risk stratification were able to access a range of remote support services, including consultations and monitoring. GPs could utilise the risk stratification tool to ensure that care could be delivered in a timely fashion and according to clinical need. The service enabled highly vulnerable patients to feel better supported at home, and rapid access to local care providers reduced the likelihood that the person would need to contact emergency services if they were struggling to manage their condition. The project resulted in a saved eight emergency admissions per week, on average, saving around £151,000 per week.

Case Study 4:

A global medical device company were looking to differentiate their product, a diagnostics device used in diabetes management, that had no data sharing capabilities. They faced strong competition from providers of similar products. However, none of the major players had a comprehensive digital offering that enabled patients to access results or analyse long-term changes in their health.

We worked with the company to develop a data and digital services offering to complement the hardware capabilities of the product and support their differentiation strategy. This included the use of data from the device to provide an analytics platform that the patient could review and share with their healthcare practitioner to support their ongoing management. The company implemented the proposed changes and designed an analytics platform that enabled access to device data for all the key stakeholders. The adaptations were successful in securing further R&D investment and attracting major multinational customers.